Difference between revisions of "PowerPC"

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The term '''PowerPC''' covers a family of microprocessors made by a variety of chip makers. Development started in the early 90's as a consequence of the Apple/IBM/Motorola alliance known as AIM.
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The term '''PowerPC''' (commonly shortened to '''PPC''') covers a family of microprocessors developed in the early '90s by a triple entente formed between Apple, IBM, and Motorola (commonly abbreviated to AIM).
 
 
PowerPC processors were used as the CPU in Macintosh computers from the first Power Macintoshes, released in 1994, up to the switch to [[Intel]] processors, starting in 2006.
 
  
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The first Mac to make use of the PowerPC was 1994's Power Macintosh 6100/60, which used the first generation 601 processor. The final Macintosh to be carry a PPC chip was the Power Macintosh G5, which had a PowerPC 970MP based CPU. The G5 was discontinued in August 2006, giving way to its successor, the Intel-based Mac Pro, and thus marking the end of the PowerPC era.
  
 
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Revision as of 20:25, 13 July 2008

The term PowerPC (commonly shortened to PPC) covers a family of microprocessors developed in the early '90s by a triple entente formed between Apple, IBM, and Motorola (commonly abbreviated to AIM).

The first Mac to make use of the PowerPC was 1994's Power Macintosh 6100/60, which used the first generation 601 processor. The final Macintosh to be carry a PPC chip was the Power Macintosh G5, which had a PowerPC 970MP based CPU. The G5 was discontinued in August 2006, giving way to its successor, the Intel-based Mac Pro, and thus marking the end of the PowerPC era.

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