Difference between revisions of "Apple Studio Display"

From 68kMLA Wiki
Jump to: navigation, search
(New page: Category:Displays)
 
Line 1: Line 1:
 +
Released in 1998 as a pair to the Power Mac G3 computers, the Apple Studio Display was one of the first monitors that hinted at an eventual transition to mostly LCD displays. The original M4551A Studio Display had an ADB connection along with a DB-15 Mac video input, and analogue video input.
 +
 +
The M4551B was sold in 1999 along with the Blue and White PowerMac G3 computers. It had a HD15 VGA port and it shared the analogue video input of the M4551A.
 +
 +
The last of the family, the M7613, is the Graphite 15" Studio Display with the DVI input. It lacks the video input, instead having a 2-port USB 1.1 hub.
 +
 +
All three revisions shipped originally with a height-adjustable desktop stand that featured nubs on which to rest the a keyboard for storage, as well as cable management features. Also included was a "pictureframe" stand that allowed the display to be moved and used as a mobile display for presentations.
 
[[Category:Displays]]
 
[[Category:Displays]]

Revision as of 10:13, 18 December 2007

Released in 1998 as a pair to the Power Mac G3 computers, the Apple Studio Display was one of the first monitors that hinted at an eventual transition to mostly LCD displays. The original M4551A Studio Display had an ADB connection along with a DB-15 Mac video input, and analogue video input.

The M4551B was sold in 1999 along with the Blue and White PowerMac G3 computers. It had a HD15 VGA port and it shared the analogue video input of the M4551A.

The last of the family, the M7613, is the Graphite 15" Studio Display with the DVI input. It lacks the video input, instead having a 2-port USB 1.1 hub.

All three revisions shipped originally with a height-adjustable desktop stand that featured nubs on which to rest the a keyboard for storage, as well as cable management features. Also included was a "pictureframe" stand that allowed the display to be moved and used as a mobile display for presentations.