68kMLA:About

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The 68kMLA Mission Statement

To quote vintage Apple manuals: "Read me first!"

Whenever there is a lost and forlorn Mac, we'll be there. Whenever there is a used Mac auction, we'll be there. Whenever there is a good Mac deal on eBay, we'll be there. Whenever someone in the community needs Mac assistance, we'll be there. Whenever someone insults the pride of a Mac, we'll be there (to beat them with a 2' x 4" with a 10" nail driven through it). We are the 68k Macintosh Liberation Army.

Some of us are collectors, some are dealers, some are just fanatics. Some are involved in direct operations, and some act on behalf others. But we all share a common goal: the successful liberation and implementation of Macintosh computers. The 68k Macintosh Liberation Army defines liberation as the removal of a machine from unloving and unappreciative surroundings. Once liberated, a rescued machine can be implemented into one's home network, a child's bedroom, a bathroom, etc. All around the world, dirty and unwanted Macs are being hidden away, retired from active duty. "Where?" you might ask. Closets, cupboards, storage rooms, and even under beds! These are not safe places for unassuming Macs. After being put there, these Macs are practically destined for life in the garbage! The mission of the 68k Macintosh Liberation Army is to put an end to this evil torture.

At the very least, these Macs must be taken from their "death row," checked, booted, and given some maintenance (a can-of-compressed-air assault, new PRAM battery and a fresh OS install). If you can find a way to return these Macs to active duty, then you have found out what it really means to be a member of the 68kMLA. Just remember: every Mac can be a source of happiness and joy for many others. 68kMLA soldiers realize that every Mac is special, every model has its merits, and almost no computer should be turned down. Even those with little space should accept old Macs, if only to pass it on to a friend (or foe, for that matter) who has not yet experienced 68k bliss. Youngsters can also benefit from and appreciate their own computers even if it may be just an LC. There are Macs which are rare, valuable, or powerful. Likewise, there are Macs which aren't rare, valuable, nor powerful. But these machines are really of no more intrinsic stature than any other Mac. ALL Macs have a right to be loved! And at the end of the day, this is what the 68k Macintosh Liberation Army is all about (that and violent assault of people who blaspheme the Quadra 950/840av series and/or think that classic Macs actually are just portable televisions).


F.A.Q.

What is the 68k Macintosh Liberation Army and what does it do?

This is answered in the 68kMLA Mission Statement. Don't you follow directions well?

What exactly does "68k" mean?

The term "68k" refers a class of Motorola processors which appeared in every Macintosh computer before coming completely overshadowed by the PowerPC chip in the mid-nineties. These include the 68000, 68020, 68030, 68040, and, referred to in a group as "680x0". The last Macintoshes to feature a 68k processor were the PowerBook 190 and 190cs, which were discontinued in 1996.

Why 68k? Isn't the PowerPC processor faster and better?

Among other things, 680x0 series Macs are unique in their sense of old-schoolness, exclusive in their value, and are widely available for liberation. Also the act of finding software for 68ks is part of the fun, since PowerPC software isn't backwards compatible with 68ks (unless, of course, it is in "fat" code).

So, do you guys hate PPCs or something?

Not at all. In fact, we even have forum categories to discuss PPC machines. However, we do try and specialise in older and more obscure machines, as there are fewer forums out there to cater for them.

When was the 68k Macintosh Liberation Army formed?

Technically, the 68k Macintosh Liberation Army was formed when MacScuzzy said "Yes! Score! We should make a Mac army and go around liberating poor old 68k Macs!" in response to a thread proclaiming the liberation of a Color Classic (FireWire is fast - 8.24.01). However, back then, it was just a bunch of people in the "Vintage Macs" section of the MacAddict forums changing their signatures and talking about saving old Macs. The 68kMLA officially became an organized group when the 68kMLA Forums opened on November 4, 2001. The 68kMLA Forums moved to their current home on December 30, 2003. On the 5th April 2007 we suffered a massive data loss, and due to this the forums were wiped and re-opened on the 1st May. We hope to have an archive of the data of (most of) 2003-2007 online as soon as possible.

What about the 68k Macintosh Liberation Army forums?

Well check them out and decide for yourself!

Why do you need your own forums? Are you too good for the MacAddict forums?

"Am", the moderator of "Vintage Macs" asked us to move our 68kMLA discussions, being not a group affiliated with MacAddict.

Fantastic! Now how do I join?

First you need to register an account on the forums. Then, the standard practice is to mozy on down to the "General 68kMLA News and Stuff" section of the forums and introduce yourself and your liberated Macs. After which, it is customary to add a few lines in your signature stating rank, and number of Macs liberated (optional). Note: titles such as "General" or "Fleet Commander" are only conferred upon enduring and valued members for long and faithful service.

Do I have to collect piles of Macs?

No, if fact you only have to be interested in Macs to join, as long as you recognize the value of old Macs and liberate them, should the chance arise, without giving a second thought. Of course, people are impressed by those who have war and liberation stories...


Grass Roots – The MacAddict forums threads that started it all…

I just liberated a Mac (MacScuzzy – 22nd August 2001): The very first thread in the MAF to use the term "liberated" as rescuing an older Mac (in this case, a Mac Classic) from an unloving environment into one that is loving and will make good use of the machine. It is this thread from which 68kMLA doctrine is based.

I liberated a mac too! (kinda) (FireWire is fast – 24th August 2001): This thread announced the liberation of a Color Classic in the same style of MacScuzzy's thread (background->liberation->system boot). MacScuzzy, after seeing that somebody else had "liberated" a mac, announced jokingly "Yes! Score! We should make a Mac army and go around liberating poor old 68k Macs." Little did he know, MacScuzzy's comment practically founded the 68K Macintosh Liberation Army. Two posts later, Erik Stiegler apparently thought we were serious and started his post with "68k Liberation Army" and told of his liberation of a Macintosh Portable. Eventually, people took to the "68k Macintosh Liberation Army" and started to adjust their signatures accordingly.

What counts as *Liberated*?? (marchie – 26 August 2001): In this thread, the term "liberation" is defined by MacScuzzy as "Seeing an old, abandoned 68k Mac and nabbing it, or paying for it, IE Liberating it, then try to bring it back to life...". This was crucial to outside enlistment because it explictily defined liberation – which is very important for somebody wishing to join the 68k Macintosh Liberation Army.

68k Macintosh Liberation Army is Here (LeeMac – 26 August 2001): It was in this thread that 68kMLA "soldiers" congregated and started forming ideas for the group. Here, FireWire is fast proposes and creates both a logo and prototypes for an official 68kMLA website.

Mac Liberation Army Pt. II (Am – 2nd September 2001): After wildly locking every 68kMLA-related thread (except for "I liberated a mac too! [kinda]"), Am created this thread. What was meant to be a place to continue our "plan of attack" just turned out to be random people posting about the Macs that they have liberated and other related chatter. Interesting.